The start-up crowdfunding process - an example (British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Québec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia)

After satisfying himself that ABC Funding Portal is on the up and up, Oliver browses through the crowdfunding projects listed on its website. He comes across Valerie's Maple Cola Company. Valerie wants to raise $75,000 by selling shares to market and bottle soft drinks flavoured with maple syrup and other local products. Oliver thinks the investment looks interesting.

Oliver reads Valerie's Maple Cola Company's offering document carefully, particularly the section that warns of the risks of this investment. Oliver does some additional research on Valerie's Maple Cola Company, Valerie herself as well as the rest of her management team, and about the beverage manufacturing business.

Oliver decides he wants to invest $750 in Valerie's Maple Cola Company. He reviews the risk warning on ABC Funding Portal website. He confirms, by ticking a box, that he has read the offering document and understands the risks he is taking. He pays for the investment using his credit card.

ABC Funding Portal holds Oliver's money in trust until Valerie raises at least $75,000. If Valerie doesn't raise her $75,000 target, ABC Funding Portal must return all Oliver's money to him, without any deductions.

If Valerie successfully raises $75,000, she can proceed to complete the start-up crowdfunding offering. Oliver is now a shareholder of Valerie's Maple Cola Company. Upon completion of the offering, Oliver receives a confirmation setting out the number of the common shares he purchased and how much he paid.

There is no guarantee as to the future value of Oliver's investment. Oliver will have to hold onto these securities for an indefinite period or even be unable to resell them at all.

The crowdfunding process under Regulation 45-108 - an example (Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, Québec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia)

Courtney has heard about crowdfunding. She goes to DEF Funding Portal's website and sees a pop-up notice that says DEF Funding Portal is registered. She checks the names of their management and does some research to see if they have ever been disciplined for bad business practices.

After satisfying herself that DEF Funding Portal is on the up and up, Courtney browses through the crowdfunding projects listed on its website. She comes across the EyeTease FX Company. The owners want to raise $1,000,000 by selling shares to expand their business that creates visual effects for major movie productions. Courtney thinks the investment looks interesting.

Courtney reads EyeTease FX Company's offering document and financial statements carefully, particularly the section that warns of the risks of this investment. Courtney does some additional research on EyeTease FX, the owners and the management team, and about the visual effects business.

Courtney decides she wants to invest $2,000 in EyeTease FX. She reviews the risk warning on DEF Funding Portal website. She confirms, by ticking a box, that she has read the offering document and understands the risks she is taking. She pays for the investment using her credit card.

DEF Funding Portal holds Courtney's money in trust until EyeTease FX raises at least $1,000,000. If EyeTease FX doesn't raise the $1,000,000 target, DEF Funding Portal must return all Courtney's money to her, without any deductions.

If EyeTease FX successfully raises $1,000,000, the company can proceed to complete the crowdfunding offering. Courtney is now a shareholder of EyeTease FX Company. Upon completion of the offering, Courtney receives a confirmation setting out the number of the common shares she purchased and how much she paid. EyeTease FX will be required to send financial statements to their shareholders at least once a year.

There is no guarantee as to the future value of Courtney's investment. Courtney may have to hold onto these securities for an indefinite period or even be unable to resell them at all.